•  The original seven "Celtic Nations" are Brittany, Scotland, Ireland, Galicia, Wales, Isle of Man and Cornwall.
  •  Dame Alice Kytler, born 1280 in Kilkenny, was the last witch in Ireland, if you believe in witches (her home is now a restaurant).
  •  A pig, allowed to live in Irish farmhouses in olden days, was once known as "the gentleman that pays the rent."
  •  Aran sweaters are created with "family weaves" designed to help a drowned fisherman's family identify him when found on the shore.
  •  According to Irish legend, on judgment day Christ will be the judge all nations, but St. Patrick will be the judge of the Irish.
  •  There are still 80 Round Towers in Ireland, 20 of them in perfect condition.
  •  45 High Crosses still remain all over Ireland.
  •  Ireland had 6 provinces at the beginning; Leinster, Meath, Munster, Connaught, Ulster and Breifne (now counties Cavan and Monaghan).
  •  Ireland is a member of the United Nations but not a member of N.A.T.O.
  •  Although the shamrock is probably the best known, internationally, of all Irish symbols, the official symbol of Ireland is the Celtic Harp.
  •  The Cliffs of Moher in Co. Clare overlook the Atlantic Ocean and are Europe's highest cliffs. The nearby Visitor Centre is Ireland's top visitor attraction outside Dublin.
  • Ireland was one of the earliest countries to establish a system of hereditary surnames. Originally, the forms were limited to prefixes i.e. Mac (meaning 'son of') and 'O' (meaning descendant of). It's a myth that Mac prefix suggests Scottish descent. It's as Irish as 'O'.
  • The first steamship to cross the Atlantic was the Sirius. It left Cobh (then called Queenstown) in 1838 and took 18 days to cross the Ocean.
  • The Celt's love of the horse has passed down the generations to produce a society that is nuts about horseracing. There are 26 racecourses across the island (more per head of population than any other country in the world.)
  • There are two types of bogland – Blanket and Raised Bog – and Ireland is rich in both. About 8% of the world's blanket bog lies within its shores, and the island is the most important area in Europe for Raised Bogs.
  • Sphagnum moss (found in irish bogs) has antiseptic properties and can hold up to twenty times its weight in water, much more than cotton. Sphagnum was used as a bandage for soldiers wounded in the Russo-Japanese War (1904-05) and World War I. By using sphagnum for bandages, cotton could be saved for making gun powder.
  • The ancestors of Davy Crockett, the so-called King of the Wild Frontier, were Huguenots who settled in Castlederg, the most westerly town in Co Tyrone. The town now has a residential area named "Crockett Park."
  • 'It's a long way to Tipperary' was written by Jack Judge. His grandparents came from the great Munster county of Tipperary.
  •  The inventor of the caterpillar track, Richard Lovell Edgeworth, lived at Edgeworthstown in Co. Longford.
  •  The roaring lion used at the start of MGM movies was born at Dublin Zoo and was called "Cairbre."
  •  In July 2010, Dublin was designated UNESCO City of Literature. The accolade recognises the capital's international standing as a city of   literary excellence, one of only four in the world (the others are Edinburgh, Iowa and Melbourne).
  • In 1991 Ireland became the first country in Europe to declare its waters a dolphin and whale sanctuary.
  •  On 11 February 1912, Cobh (then called Queenstown) was the last port of call of the "Titanic" on its maiden voyage. The ship had left Southampton the day before, picked up some additional passengers in Cherbourg, and boarded another 123 from Cobh. As the ship sailed off into the open waters of the Atlantic in the early afternoon, it had 1,308 passengers and 898 crew on board. Four days later, the ship disappeared beneath the sea.
  • Annie Moore - was the first immigrant to pass through Ellis Island. She arrived aboard the S.S. Nevada,on January 1, 1892. As the very first of 700 immigrants to disembark from her ship and two other boats that day, she was given a wondrous welcome - and also a $10.00 gold coin!(There is a statue commerating this event on the pier in Cobh, County Cork.)



     

 

.::dezynamite print & web::.